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Coffee or Tea

Research says our DNA affects whether we prefer coffee or tea.
Researchers studied how our DNA did this, and why we like some things more than others.
The researchers said people who like bitter tastes are more likely to drink coffee.
People who are more sensitive to the bitter taste of caffeine are more likely to prefer coffee.
They were also more likely to drink more coffee than people who were not so sensitive to caffeine.

Researchers looked at data on more than 400,000 people.
They also looked at the tastes of 1,757 twins and their brothers and sisters.
They said other things can also affect our taste, like our environment, social factors or medicine.
One researcher said: "Bitter taste...is shaped not only by [DNA], but also environmental factors.
Even though humans naturally dislike bitterness, we can learn to like or enjoy bitter-tasting food."



01. What did you think when you read the headline? Kyu will answer it

02. What images are in your mind when you hear the word 'coffee'? 현균 will answer it

03. What do you know about coffee? Kyu will answer it

04. What does DNA do? Joshua will answer it

05. Do you prefer coffee or tea? 희곤 will answer it

06. Do you prefer hot or cold drinks? 박현규 will answer it

07. What bitter food and drinks do you like? Lucas will answer it

08. What do you know about caffeine? Joshua will answer it

09. What would you like to drink right now? 현균 will answer it

10. Do you have a favourite cafe? 희곤 will answer it

11. How healthy is tea or coffee? Lucas will answer it

12. Should you have sugar in tea and coffee? 박현규 will answer it



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New research suggests that our DNA helps us to decide whether we prefer coffee or tea. Researchers from the University of Queensland in Australia studied how our genes affected our taste and why we like some tastes more than others. Following the research, researchers believe they know why some of us prefer coffee while others like tea more. The researchers found that people who like more bitter tastes are more likely to drink coffee. The researchers said they found something strange in their research. People who were more sensitive to the bitter taste of caffeine were more likely to prefer coffee to tea. They were also more likely to drink more coffee than those who were not so sensitive to caffeine.

Researchers looked at data on more than 400,000 men and women in the United Kingdom. They also looked at an Australian study that compared the tastes of 1,757 twins with their siblings. The researchers said genes aren't the only factors affecting people's tastes. Other things like our changing environment, social factors or the effects of taking medicine can also turn us on or off coffee or tea. The researchers said we can learn to like coffee. Dr Liang-Dar Hwang said: "Bitter taste perception is shaped not only by genetics, but also environmental factors. Even though humans naturally dislike bitterness, we can learn to like or enjoy bitter-tasting food after being exposed to environmental factors."